One of China’s largest copper/gold mines to expand dramatically

China Gold International Resources plans to expand production capacity at its Jiama mine to 50,000 t/d (Phase II plant capacity) with the addition of a new floatation plant (44,000 t/d ore), the development of two additional open-pits (Jiaoyan and South pits) and the expansion of the underground mining operation. Total production is planned to increase from its current production rate of 1.8 Mt to 16.5 Mt/y of ROM ore. Metal concentrate will be sold to smelters within China.

The company has the results of an updated NI 43-101 compliant, independent feasibility study for the Phase II Expansion of its Jiama copper-polymetallic mine in Tibet Autonomous Region, China. Mining One has produced the NI 43-101 compliant report based on the Phase II Expansion project feasibility study, prepared by the Changchun Gold Design Institute in conjunction with independent consulting engineers and the company’s management.

The Jiama project is a large scale polymetallic (Cu, Mo, Au, Ag, Pb, Zn) deposit located approximately 68 km east-northeast of Lhasa, the capital city of Tibet Autonomous Region, along the Sichuan-Tibet Highway within the Gangdise Copper Metallogeny Belt in Central Tibet, China and represents one of China’s largest copper-gold mines.

Phase I of the Jiama Project commenced commercial production in September 2010 and included the development of the Tongqianshan and Niumatang open pits. These pits currently produce 1.8 Mt/y of run-of-mine (ROM) ore. The ore from these mines is processed via two processing plants with a combined processing capacity of 6,000 t/d of ore. The company plans to expand production capacity to 50,000 t/d (Phase II plant capacity) with the addition of a new floatation plant (44,000 t/d ore), the development of two additional open-pits (Jiaoyan and South pits) and the expansion of the underground mining operation. Total production is planned to increase from its current production rate of 1.8 Mt to 16.5 Mt/y of ROM ore. Metal concentrate will be sold to smelters within China.

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